There are many aspects of health care planning including Medicare and Medicaid.  It is never too soon to think about your health care plan and how you want to live.  People are living longer and need assistance with activities of daily living (e.g., mobility, bathing,  dressing, eating). Adult children may be working full time or unable to assist their loved ones on a daily basis. Families are geographically living further apart and may be unable to directly care for their loved ones.

Most people understand that they need to ensure how their assets are managed when they die (i.e., wills).  You also need to understand how to manage your assets when you are still alive but need assistance in day-to-day living.

At the minimum, you should think about and document how you want decisions to be made for you medically if you are unable to make these decisions yourself.  This is often referred to as a living will or advanced health care directive. What information can one communicate in a living will or an advanced health care directive?  You can decide if you do not wish to be resuscitated or DNR decisions.  You can also determine whether you wish/do not wish to received artificial nutrition or hydration.

Most importantly, you can assign the power to another person to make these decisions on your behalf is called a durable health care power of attorney.  This is a person that will make your decisions for you if you are incapacitated.   Each state may require its own specific language for living wills and durable health care power of attorneys.  It is recommended that you find out requirements in your state.  Below is a link where forms for your state are made available for review, discussion and for your decisions.

Living Will Forms

Please note that dealing with situations where mental illness interferes with decision making is a different area and it is highly recommended that you talk to your physician and/or attorney if you have needs in this area.

July 19, 2018

Disclaimer: Note content of this blog post (“post”) is accurate as of the date of writing; laws change frequently and readers should not rely upon the online information.  The reader should seek the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from a lawyer licensed in the recipient’s state, country or other appropriate licensing jurisdiction.

Disclaimer: The information in this blog post (“post”) is provided for general informational purposes only, and may not reflect the current law in your jurisdiction. No information contained in this post should be construed as legal advice from LRGrunzinger Law Office or the individual author, nor is it intended to be a substitute for legal counsel on any subject matter. No reader of this post should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any information included in, or accessible through, this Post without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from a lawyer licensed in the recipient’s state, country or other appropriate licensing jurisdiction.